Ceramics

Uptown Clay

Jon Loer and Sheryl Grassie

Minneapolis, MN

www.Uptownclay.com

2017 booth # 67D

Uptown Clay is a collaborative of 15 ceramic artists working in clay on Harriet Ave. just off the Midtown Greenway. We represent a gamut of ages, genders, and viewpoints with the shared objective of creating work in the ceramic medium. Most of us create functional ceramics, using a variety of techniques to arrive at a finished product. All of us are part time artists, who live and work in the urban neighborhood. Our work is sold selectively at a handful of shows.

For the Loring Park Art Festival we will feature the work of two artists; Jon Loer and Sheryl Grassie. Sheryl creates stoneware ceramics on the pottery wheel, while Jon’s work is primarily hand built or cast ceramics. Both of these artists has been practicing their craft for over 20 years and have not sold at the Loring Park Art Festival before. Our price points range from $5.00- $60.00. Our modestly priced work is meant to be used and enjoyed by people in their daily lives.

 

© Jon Loer

© Jon Loer

© Sheryl Grassie

© Sheryl Grassie

Genevieve Loso

Genevieve Loso Pottery

Minneapolis, MN

2019 Booth #77

I create wheel-thrown pottery using mostly white stoneware. Varying forms and glazes keeps me enamored with the limitless possibilities of clay. I enjoy contrasting colors and textures within a piece. Sometimes this is accomplished using wax-resist brushwork and multiple glazes. Recently, I have been experimenting with juxtaposing clean and tight forms with ash glazes. The spontaneity of the runny glazes results in textures that cannot be duplicated. I enjoy making everyday items aesthetically pleasing without compromising functionality. My works have a finished quality to them; they are light, trimmed, and gas-fired to cone 10.

 

© Genevieve Loso

© Genevieve Loso

Adama Sow

Ceramicsow

Edina, MN

www.ceramicsow.com

2019 Booth #62

Adama Sow is a ceramist who originates from Senegal (West Africa). This master on the potter's wheel has been working with clay for more than twenty years now. After finishing high school and already inspired by his big brother Alpha Sow who also was a ceramist, Adama decided to go the Fine Art School of Dakar (Senegal) where he obtained his diploma in ceramics in 1987. As a rookie in the art world, Mr. Sow astonished everyone by the quality of his first exhibition at the Historic Museum of Goree in Dakar in 1989. During the next five years, he worked in Soumbedioune Ceramics and in his workshop in the capital city of Senegal. Also, he offered classes to both adults and children. In 1995, his thirst for Art took him to Germany where he attended the ceramics school in Horgrenzhausen.

© Adama Sow

© Adama Sow

Phillip Smith

PotterSmiths

Minneapolis, MN

2017 booth #.

I create an imaginarium, a place where a user or viewer can go, to experience a different time, and, place. I create a forum for personal improvisation. Memory and imagination provide us a perspective of reality, and of the complexity of our lives. I am stimulated by an ever growing body of knowledge of man’s innate abilities and the effect of color on our emotions.

My process includes the use of stoneware and porcelain clays. My work is formed on a wheel and altered, as well as hand formed. I use slips, stains, and glaze for my color palette. I fire in a soda atmosphere to “cone 10” or 2300 F. My work is vitreous and durable.

 

© Phillip Smith

© Phillip Smith

Paul Hofrenning

Shino pottery

Edina, MN

2017 booth # 114

I have always found comfort and enjoyment when working with my hands. When I discovered pottery in college, it became a match and I found myself being able to create work that was transpiring and satisfying. Pottery has always been what centers me. I have been drawn to Japanese and Korean pottery.

About half of my work is wheel thrown, carved and altered and the other half of my work is handbuilt textured pottery that is highly tactile.

I work with both high fire stoneware and raku. I really enjoy working with raku and am doing more and more with that process.

Upon a lot of research I started to make my own glazes and create my pieces from my own perspective with an Asian influence. Over the years I have been inspired to create work that has a strong sculptural feel to it as well as a strong tactile feel to the piece at the same time.

I try to only make work that I like myself and hopefully still find a market for my work that also enjoy what I do.

 

© Paul Hofrenning

© Paul Hofrenning

Kirk Niehouse

Marshalltown, IA

2019 Booth #48

I am the owner of and potter for Marshalltown Pottery Company which was created in 2002. I specializes in original, one-of-a-kind Raku and functional stoneware ceramics.

I separate my ceramics into two categories: wheel thrown pottery and hand-built pottery. My wheel thrown work is nonfunctional Raku or functional stoneware, which consists of bowls, plates, cups, wine chillers, colanders, bottles and vases. My wheel work is very tight and controlled, which would be a good characterization of me.

My hand-built work is much freer and more playful. It ranges from romantic candle-lit patio lanterns to elegant textured boxes with lids. It also includes textured abstract pieces created over forms to be used as bowls and vases. These pieces are then finished with the Japanese-American process of Raku to achieve metallic, copper and luster colors.

 

 

© Kirk Niehouse

© Kirk Niehouse

Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

Spring Creek Clay,Etc
Rice Lake, WI
BruceKaupanger.com
2019 booth #92

I do Raku pottery and add horsehair to each piece- Underglazes are added to the pot before it is bisque fired-A clear glaze is used on the pot so the underglaze colors will come through- After the hot pot comes out of the glaze kiln horsehair is added creating a carbon trail design.  When my Raku pots dry I spray them with colored underglazes.  After bisque firing, I paint a clear glaze on the pot; this allows the  underglaze color to come through,  When the hot pot comes out of the glaze kiln I put it in a bucket of sawdust then apply horsehair.

Born and raised in Stoughton Wisconsin.  I graduated from UW-Eau Claire with a BA in 1969 and from UW-Superior with a MA in 1975.  Taught art in the Rice Lake Wisconsin School District for 33 years.   Retired in 2002 and have been making lots of pots ever since.  I am blessed with a wonderful understanding family.  Life is GOOD !!                                                                                                                                             

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

© Bruce Kaupanger

Nicholas Kosack

Minneapolis, MN
2017 booth #

My sculptural work begins as wheel thrown forms and are then manipulated before drying to create their distinct flowing curves and various textures. This work is an exploration of tensions, finding a point between intentionality and spontaneity, structure and fluidity. While also wheel thrown, my functional work aims for a more humble elegance which preserves the shapes and textures formed by fingers in clay. I like to think of it as a gift from my fingers to yours.

 

© Nicholas Kosack

© Nicholas Kosack

Bridget Donahue

Excelsior, MN
www.bridgetdonahue.com
2018 booth #127

Red earthenware, thrown, hand-built, and tiles. The piece is first decorated with bright colored slip, carved and or textured, then fired the first time. Slip is then applied again and rubbed off to enhance the textured area. The piece is then glaze and fired again. Tiles are mounted on canvas-covered plywood, painted to highlight the colors of the tiles, and then framed in painted wood frames.

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© Bridget Donahue

© Bridget Donahue

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